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Michelle Loxton

Podcast and Digital Content Producer

Michelle Loxton joined KCLU in June 2021 as Podcast and Digital Content Producer.

Michelle overseas digital products at KCLU and is the host and creator of station's first award-winning podcast The One Oh One.

The very first episode of The One Oh One (an episode about the crisis of fentanyl in Ventura County) won first place at 64th annual L.A. Press Club awards for 'use of sound' in the 'Audio Journalism' category.

Michelle has worked in talk and news radio for a decade. Before joining KCLU, she worked in public radio as a reporter and host at KAZU (NPR for the Monterey Bay area). At KAZU she was part of the news team that won a National Edward R. Murrow award for the continued coverage of the four major wildfires that ravaged the Central Coast in 2020. Her reporting also extensively covered the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the Central Coast community.

Before moving to California, Michelle worked in Dubai at the Arabian Radio Network for almost five years. There she took on a variety of roles including reporter, producer, newscaster and host. She covered a wide variety of topics from breaking news (the tragic Emirates and FlyDubai plane crashes) to lifestyle events (she was the main correspondent for the Dubai International Film Festival).

Michelle's radio career started in her home country of South Africa where she worked at CapeTalk as a producer and in community radio as a host and producer.

  • In Fall 2022, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians are slated to open a museum and cultural center on their reservation – something they call a long anticipated dream. The museum will be filled with stories that were lost for a long time, along with exhibits and events that showcase their own language that was only recently rediscovered. In this episode we speak to the tribe and go inside the future museum.
  • This Fall, a museum and cultural center is slated to open on the reservation of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians. The museum will be filled with stories that were lost for decades, along with exhibits and events that showcase their own language that was only recently rediscovered.
  • Cerisa House Wesley was the first African American born in the City of Ventura. Her life is remarkable not just because of her historic birth, but because despite her being a qualified nurse she was never allowed to use her skills in a hospital setting because of the color of her skin.
  • Cerisa House Wesley was the first African American born in the City of Ventura. The year was 1898. And this was the first documented birth at least. Her life is remarkable not just because of her historic birth, but because despite her being a qualified nurse she was never allowed to use her skills in a hospital setting because of the color of her skin. This is the story of a Black nurse no hospital would hire.
  • There are over two million undocumented people living in California. No matter your opinion on illegal immigration, industries like agriculture have a demand for these workers. They’re here. Working and living. In this episode of The One Oh One, we wanted to give you a glimpse into the lives of the undocumented and specifically those that have been 'without papers' a really long time. We're talking decades.
  • These are the incredible comeback stories of three creatures, living along the Central, South Coasts, that at one stage almost disappeared but are now experiencing a resurgence.
  • Once upon a time there was a clam, a butterfly and a fox. They all called the central California Coast their home. They lived happily among trees, on mostly uninhabited islands and hidden under the sand on the beach.But then they all almost disappeared. Why? Some because of human activity – for others, who knows.But this tale does have a happy ending because all these creatures are coming back… some, really quickly.On this episode of The One Oh One – the Pismo Beach Clam, the Monarch Butterfly and the Channel Islands Fox... a comeback story.
  • One in three high school students across the U.S. have reported persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness. In the decade leading up to 2019 suicide rates went up 57% among teens and young adults.That’s according to a Surgeon General report which says young people are experiencing a mental health crisis.I wanted to find out if these grim statistics were being reflected locally. Sadly the answer is yes. I had no idea how bad it was.In this episode of The One Oh One, the state of youth mental health on California’s Central, South Coast, why this is happening and those trying to help.
  • According to a Surgeon General report, in the decade leading up to 2019 suicide rates went up 57% among teens and young adults. KCLU wanted to find out if these grim statistics were being reflected locally. Sadly the answer is yes.
  • There’s a spot on Highway 101 in Agoura Hills, California – it’s pretty inconspicuous. There’s brown and green rolling hills on either side of the highway. Homes are sprinkled here and there. And then a small metal gate that leads off on a hiking trail. You probably wouldn’t know it, but soon this spot will be the location of the world’s largest animal crossing.This crossing will reconnect habitats that have been cut off from each other for three quarters of a century and it’ll do it over a highway that is constantly buzzing with cars. It’s a massive project full of firsts.On this episode of The One Oh One, the building of the world’s largest animal crossing.