Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Nine days before Britain's scheduled departure from the European Union, European Council President Donald Tusk said Wednesday that an extension for withdrawal is possible – but only if U.K. parliament members approve Prime Minister Theresa May's terms.

The condition stands to push British parliamentarians to vote a third time on May's deal or prepare for a historic divorce without any deal at all.

A woman in Georgia has been arrested and charged with conspiring to provide material support for ISIS.

Kim Anh Vo, 20, was arrested Tuesday morning in the town of Hephzibah.

Federal prosecutors in New York allege that Vo joined an online group called the United Cyber Caliphate, which had sworn allegiance to ISIS and encouraged followers to attack Americans.

On Tuesday, a Bahraini refugee soccer player who was jailed and facing deportation arguably got his biggest goal — citizenship in a foreign country.

Hakeem al-Araibi, 25, was one of about 200 people who became Australia citizens at a ceremony in Melbourne.

Russians, fearing digital isolation and more censorship on the horizon, gathered in the streets of Moscow and other cities on Sunday to protest a new bill calling for Russia to be cut off from the global Internet.

Updated at 6:07 p.m. ET

Olympic cycling medalist Kelly Catlin died in her dorm at Stanford University last Thursday, an abrupt end to the 23-year-old's accolade-filled life.

Her family tells NPR that she took her own life.

"Waves of despair come over us," her father, Mark Catlin, says. "She promised us she wasn't going to kill herself."

European Union officials have moved to clarify travel regulations for U.S. citizens, following erroneous reports this week that Americans will soon be required to apply for visas.

A new report published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention details the harrowing story of a child in Oregon who contracted tetanus because he wasn't vaccinated.

The boy was playing outside on a farm in 2017 when he cut his forehead. Six days later, he started having symptoms: a clenched jaw, muscle spasms and involuntary arching of his neck and back. When he started struggling to breathe, his parents realized he needed help and called for emergency medical services.

A massive power outage has swept across Venezuela, leaving its two leaders at odds over who is to blame for plunging the country into darkness at a time of deep political unrest.

The outage began Thursday evening at rush hour, bringing the subway system in Caracas to a halt. Thousands of commuters returned home on foot, their walks lit only by mobile phones and the stars.

Facing accusations in an election year that he pressured his former attorney general on a prominent criminal case, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau insisted Thursday that the debacle stemmed from a breakdown in trust and communication.

At a news conference in Ottawa, he told reporters that trust had deteriorated between Jody Wilson-Raybould, the former attorney general who resigned from Trudeau's cabinet in February, and Gerald Butts, Trudeau's former top aide who also resigned last month.

A court in Thailand has voted unanimously to dissolve an opposition political party that nominated a princess as its sole candidate for prime minister, raising concerns about the fairness and legitimacy of the country's elections on March 24.

A day after a sign at an event sponsored by the Republican Party of West Virginia linked one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the head of the state GOP is putting distance between the party and the poster.

The sign led to a spat, an injury, an official's resignation and potential disciplinary action against a lawmaker.

The desperate shouts for help from gold miners who have been trapped for days under debris on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi have fallen silent, an official said Saturday.

The illegal mine collapsed on Tuesday in Bolaang Mongondow, after soil shifted in the sloping, green terrain and wooden support beams at the site suddenly broke.

Eight miners have died and 20 have been rescued, according to The Associated Press. About three dozen people are thought to still be trapped.

Dozens of journalists and media outlets that reported on the sex abuse conviction of the world's most high-ranking Catholic cleric ever charged with such crimes could face fines or jail time for breaching a gag order.

Authorities in Sweden have arrested a person on suspicion of being a Russian agent.

The individual, whose name has not been disclosed, was passing information to Russia since 2017, the Swedish Security Service says. He or she was working in a high-technology sector "on tasks known by our Service to be the type of intelligence sought after by foreign powers," the agency said.

Swedish police officers working with security service agents arrested the suspect on Tuesday evening, in the midst of a meeting in central Stockholm.

Russian President Vladimir Putin's spokesman says that websites in the country are constantly under cyberattack by the United States, and that shows why Russia is pursuing an autonomous Internet.

Dmitry Peskov told reporters in Moscow on Wednesday that the United States has carried out a number of digital attacks on Russian entities and people. "This is the reality with which we live," he said, according to Russian state news agency Tass.

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