Huo Jingnan

Huo Jingnan (she/her) is an assistant producer on NPR's investigations team. She helps with reporting, research, and production both on the team and in the network. She was the primary data reporter on Coal's Deadly Dust, a project investigating black lung disease's resurgence. The project won an Edward Murrow Award and NASEM Communications award, and was nominated for a George Foster Peabody award.

She has also analyzed air monitoring data to see if lockdowns under the coronavirus pandemic made the air cleaner, and investigated why face mask guidelines differ between countries.

Huo has a master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

After an amphibious assault vehicle (AAV) sank with 16 crew members inside during training on Thursday off the Southern California coast, the Marine Corps announced Sunday that the eight missing service members are now presumed dead.

Eight Marines on board were rescued. One of those died soon after being hospitalized and two are in critical condition.

The eight now presumed dead are seven Marines and one Navy sailor.

Tropical Storm Isaias is continuing its push toward Florida's east coast on Sunday after battering the Bahamas with heavy rainfall and gusty winds.

Isaias, which was downgraded to a tropical storm after reaching hurricane status, is whipping up sustained winds of 65 miles per hour and could bring 1 to 7 inches of rainfall from Florida to New England in the coming week, according to the National Hurricane Center.

More widespread wearing of face masks could prevent tens of thousands of deaths by COVID-19, epidemiologists and mathematicians project.

A model from the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation shows that near-universal wearing of cloth or homemade masks could prevent between 17,742 and 28,030 deaths across the US before Oct. 1.

Of the world's 20 poorest states, the Democratic Republic of the Congo spends the least per citizen on health care — $19 per person annually.

And in Sierra Leone, the highest health spender among those states south of the Sahara, it's over triple — $66 per capita.

That's still just a fraction of how much the world's wealthiest countries spend on each of their residents' health. In the United States, the number is nearly $10,000. Half of the 20 richest countries spend at least $5,000 per person.

Don't see the graphic above? Click here.

With traffic dramatically down in recent months, the United States is in the middle of an accidental experiment showing what happens to air pollution when millions of people stop driving.

A bipartisan group of lawmakers is demanding answers from the Treasury Department and the IRS about improper coronavirus relief checks paid out to deceased taxpayers.

There's one thing that distinguishes the nursing homes in New York that have reported patient deaths from COVID-19. According to an NPR analysis, they are far more likely to be made up of people of color.

NPR looked at 78 nursing homes in New York in which six or more residents have died of COVID-19. In one facility, 55 people have died as of April 20. Ten others report 30 or more deaths.

Updated at 10:10 p.m. ET

One month ago today, President Trump declared a national emergency.

In a Rose Garden address, flanked by leaders from giant retailers and medical testing companies, he promised a mobilization of public and private resources to attack the coronavirus.

"We've been working very hard on this. We've made tremendous progress," Trump said. "When you compare what we've done to other areas of the world, it's pretty incredible."

But few of the promises made that day have come to pass.

On Feb. 29, the U.S. surgeon general Dr. Jerome Adams tweeted that masks do not offer any benefit to the average citizen.

Updated March 31, 8:25 p.m. ET

A few months ago, it may have seemed silly to wear a face mask during a trip to the grocery store. And in fact, the mainline public health message in the U.S. from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been that most people don't need to wear masks.

But as cases of the coronavirus have skyrocketed, there's new thinking about the benefits that masks could offer in slowing the spread. The CDC says it is now reviewing its policy and may be considering a recommendation to encourage broader use.

On Weibo, the Chinese version of Twitter, user 一只猫叫鱼Yu kept a public diary of her lockdown experience in Wuhan, China. On day 29, she described losing track of time. "I watch the days go by one after another," she wrote. "I don't know how long days like this are going to last."

With jittery shoppers flocking to supermarkets to stock up on supplies for the coronavirus outbreak, some of the country's largest grocery chains are announcing measures to enhance sanitation and maintain supplies.

Across the U.S., hand sanitizer, toilet paper, sanitation wipes and canned goods have been flying off shelves as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases continues to climb.

Updated at 4:42 p.m. ET

More than two dozen rockets were fired at a military base north of Baghdad hosting American forces Saturday morning, wounding three members of the U.S.-led coalition and two Iraqi soldiers, the coalition's spokesperson announced in a tweet.

Hundreds of protesters gathered in London Saturday to demand the release of Julian Assange ahead of a court hearing on Monday over whether the WikiLeaks founder should be extradited to the United States.

The U.S. reportedly formally requested extradition last June to answer a number of charges, including conspiring to hack government computer networks and the unlawful receipt of sensitive information.

More than 10,000 civilians were killed or injured in armed conflict in Afghanistan in 2019, continuing a six-year streak and putting total casualties in the past decade over 100,000, a United Nations report said Saturday.

Pages