Greg Rosalsky

Since 2018, Greg Rosalsky has been a writer and reporter at NPR's Planet Money.

Before joining NPR, he spent more than five years at Freakonomics Radio, where he produced 60 episodes that were downloaded nearly 100 million times. Those included an exposé of the damage filmmaking subsidies have on American visual-effects workers, a deep dive into the successes and failures of Germany's manufacturing model, and a primer on behavioral economics, which he wrote as a satire of traditional economic thought. Among the show's most popular episodes were those he produced about personal finance, including one on why it's a bad idea for people to pick and choose stocks.

Rosalsky has written freelance articles for a number of publications, including The Behavioral Scientist and Pacific Standard. An article he authored about food inequality in New York City was anthologized in Best Food Writing 2017.

Rosalsky began his career in the plains of Iowa working for an underdog presidential candidate named Barack Obama and was a White House researcher during the early years of the Obama Administration.

He earned a master's degree at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School, where he studied economics and public policy.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Before we get going, can we ask that you think about giving to your member station this year? Link here. Great, now that that's out of the way, can we talk about whether the charitable deduction on the federal income tax makes any sense at all?

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Normally, peer review is a boring process held behind the closed doors of the ivory tower. But the debate over The Triumph Of Injustice, the new book by Gabriel Zucman and Emmanuel Saez, has become like a proxy battle for the Democratic presidential primary.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Wealth Tax Showdown

Oct 1, 2019

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

"I don't think that billionaires should exist," Senator and presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said last week. And he's now proposed a way to get rid of them: his version of a wealth tax on the .1% richest families in America.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Feeling sluggish? Having trouble achieving and maintaining productivity growth? Does it feel like investment will never, ever go up? You may be experiencing secular stagnation.

Symptoms include persistently low interest rates and weak inflation. Also, mediocre economic growth, despite a diet of huge deficits and cheap credit.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Silvio Gesell hated money. A German entrepreneur who moved to Argentina for business in the late 19th century, he witnessed a massive financial crash in 1890 that convinced him that money was behind the world's economic problems: poverty, inequality, unemployment, stagnation.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Put down those Popsicles. No more sleeping in. Beach time is over.

Economists have long hated summer vacation. All those wasted school facilities! All that educational backsliding! Kids are getting dumber!

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Something is strange with the economy.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

In 1944, almost exactly 75 years ago, more than 700 representatives from 44 nations traveled to the Mount Washington Hotel, a secluded resort in the mountains of Bretton Woods, N.H. With World War II coming to an end, they arrived to hammer out a new financial system for the global economy.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Pages