Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

This year's South by Southwest festivals in Austin, Texas, will have more than the usual dose of Washington, D.C.

President Obama will be talking with the editor in chief of The Texas Tribune in an conversation that will open SXSW Interactive, while first lady Michelle Obama will deliver the keynote address for SXSW Music.

The U.N. Security Council unanimously approved new sanctions on North Korea on Wednesday, in response to a recent nuclear test and rocket launch that violated U.N. resolutions on the country's military activities.

Sports Authority has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, looking to restructure its debt and close a number of stores to try to regain its financial foothold.

The sporting goods retailer is carrying a heavy debt load.

In its restructuring, Sports Authority plans to access nearly $600 million in debtor-in-possession financing and close or sell approximately 140 stores and two distribution centers. The company operates more than 460 locations.

Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii has resigned her position as vice chair of the Democratic National Committee to endorse Bernie Sanders.

Gabbard announced her decision on NBC's Meet the Press Sunday morning.

On the Sunday morning talk shows, Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump refused to condemn endorsements from a prominent white supremacist and former KKK leader, and said he retweeted a Mussolini quote because "it's a very good quote."

Partial results from Iran's elections on Friday indicate that pro-reform moderates will win all 30 of Tehran's parliamentary seats — a victory for Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, and a blow to Iran's hard-liners.

Tehran's delegation is only a fraction of Iran's 290-seat parliament, and NPR's Peter Kenyon reports that conservative representatives are likely to do well in other parts of the country — but the gains in the capital are significant.

Robert Mugabe, the president of Zimbabwe, celebrated his 92nd birthday with an enormous party — and inspired plenty of rage along the way. His critics pointed out that his pricey bash was held in a region battling a devastating drought.

The longtime leader of Zimbabwe (who shows no sign of stepping down from his post, despite his advanced age) marked his Feb. 21 birthday with several parties earlier this week. But the main event was Saturday's massive celebration in Masvingo, which was attended by thousands of Zimbabweans.

Well into the first day of a "cessation of hostilities" in Syria, most of the parties involved appear to be abiding by the delicate truce.

From Turkey, NPR's Alice Fordham reported that after the agreement went into effect at midnight local time, a pause in fighting largely held overnight:

The man suspected of killing three people and injuring more than a dozen others in shootings Thursday in Kansas had been served a protection-from-abuse order earlier that afternoon, according to Harvey County Sheriff T. Walton.

The shooter, whom Walton identified as 38-year-old Cedric Ford, was served the order at 3:30 p.m. CT at the Excel Industries manufacturing plant in Hesston where he worked. An hour and a half later, the shootings began.

Ted Olson is one of the most prominent lawyers working in America today. He argued on behalf of George W. Bush in Bush v. Gore and was the solicitor general for most of Bush's first term. A star conservative lawyer, he surprised many when he joined the fight to legalize same-sex marriage, taking up the battle against California's Proposition 8 (and allying with David Boies, who argued for Gore in Bush v. Gore).

After overwhelmingly approving new reform measures, FIFA members have narrowly elected Gianni Infantino of Switzerland as their next president.

The first round of voting wasn't decisive — while Infantino, general secretary of Europe's UEFA soccer organization, edged out Sheikh Salman of Bahrain, the favorite leading into the election, neither reached the required two-thirds majority of the 207 votes.

In the second round of voting, which only required a simple majority, Infantino took home 115 votes.

Apple and the FBI are facing off in court over an encrypted iPhone 5C that was used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook. The phone stopped backing up to the cloud, which the investigators have already searched, several weeks before the Dec. 2 attack.

After a court ordered Apple to help federal investigators get into an encrypted iPhone, the company responded with a court filing Thursday that describes the FBI-requested order as illegal, unconstitutional and dangerous.

"No court has ever authorized what the government now seeks, no law supports such unlimited and sweeping use of the judicial process, and the Constitution forbids it," Apple's lawyers wrote in the company's motion to vacate the order.

Publishing giant Simon & Schuster is launching a new imprint, Salaam Reads, which will focus on children's and young adult books featuring Muslim kids and families.

The company said in a statement that it believes Salaam Reads, launched Wednesday, is "the first imprint at a major publisher focused on Muslim characters and stories." (The five big publishing houses are home to several Christian imprints, while numerous small, independent publishers focus on a variety of religions.)

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