Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Updated at 12:21 p.m. ET

Dutch police are searching for a man who opened fire inside a tram in the city of Utrecht, killing three people and wounding five others late Monday morning. Police say they're investigating a "possible terrorist motive" for the attack.

Utrecht Mayor Jan van Zanen confirmed the three deaths in a video update around 3 p.m. local time, saying that three of the wounded are facing serious injuries.

An intense winter storm — a "bomb cyclone" of snow and wind — has stranded drivers and shut down interstates in the Rockies and Plains regions of the U.S.

Colorado's National Guard said Thursday that it has now rescued 75 people and two dogs, after checking on 148 vehicles stuck in the storm.

Updated at 5:48 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it is temporarily grounding all Boeing 737 Max aircraft operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory.

The announcement Wednesday afternoon follows decisions by many other countries to ground the planes after 157 people died in Sunday's crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8.

Updated at 10:15 p.m. ET

Federal officials have charged dozens of well-heeled parents, including actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, in what the Justice Department says was a multimillion-dollar scheme to cheat college admissions standards. The parents allegedly paid a consultant who then fabricated academic and athletic credentials and arranged bribes to help get their children into prestigious universities.

Bowing to weeks of protests, Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika has reversed his decision to run for a fifth term and says he will not seek re-election. But the 82-year-old leader stopped short of stepping down and has delayed elections set for next month.

"I particularly understand the message given by youth, in terms of anxiety and ambition for their own future and that of the country," Bouteflika said in a message published by the Algeria Press Service.

The U.S. has apparently warned Germany that if Chinese tech companies such as Huawei help build the country's new 5G telecom infrastructure, U.S. agencies might not share as much intelligence with the German government as they currently do.

That's the gist of a letter U.S. Ambassador Richard A. Grenell recently sent to German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier, according to The Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is drawing criticism for saying that Israel is "the national state, not of all its citizens, but only of the Jewish people." The comment prompted many people — including Israel's president and the star of Wonder Woman — to defend Israel's Palestinian Arab minority.

Palestinian Arab citizens are about a fifth of Israel's population and often face discrimination and accusations of disloyalty.

Updated at 9:20 p.m. ET

The Federal Aviation Administration says it plans to require a series of design changes to the Boeing 737 Max fleet after a pair of fatal plane crashes including one Sunday in Ethiopia that killed all 157 people on board. Airlines in other countries have grounded their Boeing 737 Max jets.

As NPR's Russell Lewis reports, the FAA plans to order the changes by next month.

Chelsea Manning, the former Army private, is back in U.S. federal custody, jailed over her refusal to testify before a grand jury in a case involving WikiLeaks and Julian Assange.

Judge Claude Hilton of the U.S. District Court in Eastern Virginia ordered Manning to jail Friday "after a brief hearing in which Manning confirmed she has no intention of testifying," the Associated Press reports.

Hilton said Manning must stay in custody until she either changes her mind about testifying or the grand jury finishes its work.

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

The SpaceX Crew Dragon hit its splashdown time of 8:45 a.m. ET right on target Friday, landing in the Atlantic Ocean after undocking from the International Space Station and re-entering Earth's atmosphere.

The successful test and splashdown is "an amazing achievement in American history," said NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine, who called the SpaceX flight the "dawning of a new era in American human space flight."

The U.S. government compiled dossiers on journalists who reported on the 2018 migrant caravan as well as activists and others involved in the event — and agents used the database to target people for secondary screenings, according to a San Diego TV station, which says a source in the Department of Homeland Security shared proof of the interagency project focused on the U.S. Southwest border.

A court in Lyon, France, has convicted Cardinal Philippe Barbarin — one of France's most prominent Catholic officials — of not reporting accusations of deprivation or sexual abuse of Boy Scouts by a priest in his diocese.

After the ruling, Barbarin said he would offer his resignation to Pope Francis. Separately, his lawyer said he also would appeal the court's guilty verdict.

Everyone who had been reported missing after violent tornadoes struck eastern Alabama Sunday is now accounted for and authorities said Wednesday that they don't expect the death toll of 23 people to change. The mission is now about recovery, Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones said.

The money was there — it was just locked away. At least that's what the QuadrigaCX cryptocurrency exchange had been saying, before an auditor revealed it had finally accessed digital wallets set up by Quadriga's late CEO Gerald Cotten — and that instead of holding $137 million, the wallets were empty, drained in 2018.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra says Terrence Mercadal and Jared Robinet — the police officers who shot and killed Stephon Clark last March — will not face charges. The two officers fired on Clark, who was unarmed, after a foot chase that ended in his grandmother's backyard.

Pages