Economy

Financial and business news

Eldorado Resorts is buying Caesars Entertainment for $17.3 billion, in a cash-and-stock deal that the companies say will create the largest gambling company in the U.S.

To acquire the venerable Caesars name and properties, Eldorado will part with $7.2 billion in cash and around 77 million in stock shares. It will also take on Caesars' outstanding debt. Its shareholders will wind up with 51 percent of the combined company.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Mark Hamill remembers the first time he learned about voice acting — he was watching a Walt Disney special about animation and he saw Clarence Nash "this guy in a suit and a microphone" doing the voice of Donald Duck. "I must have been five or six and a light bulb went off in my head ..." Hamill says. "Suddenly it occurred to me that somebody gets up in the morning, goes to work, and does Donald Duck for his job. I want that job!"

NICOLE WEISENSEE EGAN: Last Sunday, Bill Cosby's official social media account sent out a message wishing everyone a Happy Father's Day from America's dad. Not too long ago, this would not have raised many eyebrows. Bill Cosby was associated with the best of everything - not just a comedian, but a beloved one - not just a TV pioneer, but one of the most successful of his era - a major philanthropist, an educator, a mentor, a father figure - as he put it, America's dad.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Going on vacation and want some extra security around your home? Someday you may be able to call Amazon's drones.

The Seattle tech giant is moving closer to making that scenario a real possibility after winning approval from federal officials this month for a patent for "home surveillance" drones.

Himesh Patel On The Beatles And 'Yesterday'

Jun 22, 2019

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Back in the fall of 1995, Randy Newman was a 52-year-old veteran singer-songwriter, known more for songs that told stories, often sung as a character. He was also a multiple Oscar-nominated composer of grown-up scores for films like The Natural. But if you're of a certain age, you might only know Newman as "the Toy Story Guy."

"I mean, there's no competing with Toy Story, in terms of the reach of it," Newman says. "It inevitably appeals to, you know, hundreds of millions that I wouldn't appeal to."

It's gotten a lot harder for first-time homebuyers to nab that dream house. The pool of smaller, affordable starter houses is low. And increasingly, first-time homebuyers are competing with investors who are buying up these homes.

Last year, investors accounted for 1 in 5 starter-priced homes, according to data released by CoreLogic on Thursday. The rate of investor purchases of starter homes has been rising and has nearly doubled since 1999.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Your files are done syncing, and you go to plug in your thumb drive. You try once. Failure ensues. Metal clashes with metal. Humiliated and discouraged, you flip it and try again. Failure, again! How could this be possible?

Wiping your brow, ready to give up, you flip back to the original orientation for a final try. The hard-won success is unsatisfying, tainted by the absurdity of the process.

Updated at 9:28 a.m. ET

If you listen carefully, you'll hear something unusual on the presidential campaign trail this year. Democratic candidates are talking a lot about the lack of affordable housing, an issue that rarely, if ever, comes up in an election. They're trying to tap into a growing national concern, as well as a potential voting bloc.

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