David Folkenflik

And they said print is dead. Janice Min turned around Us Weekly and now The Hollywood Reporter — transforming an ailing trade daily into a glossy magazine with new relevance for advertisers, the entertainment community and readers beyond.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

For more than a generation, politicians have been on notice that political opponents would hold them accountable through deep dives into their records — a practice called oppo research.

This election cycle, candidates for the White House also have found themselves trying to dodge a buzz saw: BuzzFeed.

NPR is acting to clarify the role of longtime analyst and commentator Cokie Roberts after she co-wrote a syndicated newspaper column calling for "the rational wing" of the Republican Party to stop Donald Trump's march toward its presidential nomination.

Soon after its launch in 1986, the satirical magazine Spy picked Donald Trump as the brash embodiment of a crass age. Founded by Graydon Carter and Kurt Andersen, the magazine chronicled New York's obsessions with wealth and social status, zeroing in on Trump's questionable business dealings (of which there were many) and his outlandish personal traits (of which there were perhaps even more).

Last year, The Huffington Post assigned stories on Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump to the entertainment section, seeing him as a buffoonish diversion.

It now appears to view Trump as a threat, attaching an editor's note to the end of every article about him to inform readers he "is a serial liar, rampant xenophobe, racist, misogynist, birther and bully."

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now some media news. NBC cut ties with Melissa Harris-Perry, who had been hosting a weekend show on the cable network MSNBC. NPR's David Folkenflik reports Harris-Perry questioned the network's commitment to progressive voices and people of color.

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