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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

WW, formerly known as Weight Watchers, has a new app now for kids. It's called Kurbo. The app asks kids to track what they eat and sorts food into good and bad categories without mention of calorie counts. Some experts say this approach could have serious health consequences, including development of eating disorders. At the same time, though, child obesity is on the rise and can lead to medical problems such as high blood pressure and diabetes. Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford specializes in obesity medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital. She joins us now.

Locusts are not just a biblical plague. They're swarming around the world. Still. Again.

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the desert locust situation is serious in Yemen and at the Indo-Pakistan border.

It has been a tumultuous quarter century for San Francisco, what with the rise of its neighbor, Silicon Valley, and the changes that came with it. But at least a couple of things have stayed reliably consistent, such as the distinctive Bay Area fog that's so familiar it even has a name (just call it Karl) and the live webcam that watches it from the campus of San Francisco State University.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is extending a reprieve for Huawei Technologies and U.S. companies working with the telecom giant by 90 days, the Commerce Department announced Monday.

Lisa Cameron is a member of the British Parliament. She's also a victim, and survivor, of online trolls.

Cameron was new to politics in 2015, when she was elected in East Kilbride, Scotland. She'd been a clinical psychologist, a wife, a mom, and a trade union representative — the kind of political newcomer democracies want to run for office.

Virtual reality is not new. But, as people search for alternative ways to manage pain — and reduce reliance on pills — VR is attracting renewed attention.

Imagine, for a moment you've been transported to a sunlit lagoon. And, suddenly, it's as if you're immersed in the warm water and swimming. That's what Tom Norris experiences when he straps on his VR headset.

The U.S. has the worst rate of maternal deaths in the developed world.

Marium, an orphaned dugong cared for by biologists in southern Thailand, had what it takes to win over the Internet. Few could resist pictures and videos of the button-eyed mammal being fed sea grass and bottled milk and even being cuddled by her caregivers, all while seeming to wear a satisfied smile.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Fighting Seagulls In Ocean City, N.J.

Aug 17, 2019

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Joanna Schroeder started getting worried when her sons were coming to her with loaded questions.

"One of my kids said: If you can be trans and just decide what you are then how come you can't just decide to be a penguin?" said Schroeder, a writer and mother of two sons and a daughter, in an interview with NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Anthropomorphic

About Denise Herzing's TED Talk

We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking it.

About Denise Herzing

Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?

Aug 16, 2019

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Anthropomorphic.

About Barbara King's TED Talk

In 2018, an orca made headlines when she carried her dead calf on her back for weeks. Barbara King says this was a display of animal grief and explains how this changes our relationship with animals.

About Barbara King

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Before humans walked the Earth, there were dinosaurs, woolly mammoths and monster penguins?

PAUL SCOFIELD: It's actually about the same height as the average New Zealand woman.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Say the word "exosuit" and superheroes come to mind — somebody like Tony Stark from Marvel Comics, whose fancy suit enables him to become Iron Man.

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