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Can Police Be Taught To Intervene When Colleagues Violate Safety Rules? One Professor Says Yes

This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office in Minnesota on Wednesday, June 3, 2020, shows from left, former Minneapolis police officers J. Alexander Kueng (left), Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. (Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP)
This combination of photos provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office in Minnesota on Wednesday, June 3, 2020, shows from left, former Minneapolis police officers J. Alexander Kueng (left), Thomas Lane and Tou Thao. (Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP)

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was found guilty of the murder of George Floyd. In August, a jury will determine whether three fellow Minneapolis police officers are complicit because they did not intervene to stop him.

One officer, Thomas Lane, made a few suggestions but backed down when Chauvin asserted everything was fine. At least one intervention expert wonders whether intervention training would have given Lane and the others the tools to oppose their colleague and senior officer.

Ervin Staub, a professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has dedicated his career to the psychology of intervening and more recently to training officers around the country. He talks to host Robin Young about his research and the Active Bystandership for Law Enforcement (ABLE) program he spearheaded.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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