UCSB

It’s an iconic part of California’s history which has been commemorated in many ways, on the state’s flag, and through mascots for major universities like UCLA and UC Berkeley. 

Now, a project led by a UC Santa Barbara researcher is underway to help us learn more about the extinct California Grizzly bear.

One of the most exciting players to come out of UC Santa Barbara, Alan Williams, is going to play for the Phoenix Suns on a regular basis.

The three year deal with the NBA team was reportedly for $17 million.

A tremendous amount of food goes to waste. So, a university on the South Coast is leading the way in diverting food waste from landfills. Students are composting on campus.

I step into an electric car here at UC Santa Barbara.

"This is our composting mobile. We use all electric vehicles here because our goal is zero waste," said Kaitlyn Haberlin, an environmental studies and archeology double major.

Photo by Peter Allen/Brian Long

UC Santa Barbara scientists have corrected a flaw in antibiotic testing that could now help patients recover from infections.

The standard antibiotic test has been used worldwide since 1961. But UC Santa Barbara biologist Michael Mahan says it may not be working as well as it should be.

“People are not petri plates. And because the test is on a petri plate, it does not accurately reflect what may happen in the body,” he said.

A three day sit-in and sleepover at UC Santa Barbara led to Chancellor Henry Yang agreeing to support their environmental campaign.

The protesting students were asking the Chancellor to support an effort to get UC Regents to divest the system's investments in fossil fuels.

Photo by Emily Read

The number of native oysters off the California Coast has been diminishing to the point that only a sparse population is left. But, a group of students on the South Coast are gathering information to help future oyster recovery efforts.

Graduate students from UC Santa Barbara’s Bren School of Environmental Science and Management are trekking across the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve on land and in water in search of native California oysters called Olympia oysters.

Students at UC Santa Barbara have wrapped up a sit-in at the office of Chancellor Henry Yang.

It lasted from around 9 p.m. Wednesday night until about 4 a.m. Thursday morning.

Photo by UC Santa Barbara

Scientists at a South Coast university are using crowd-sourcing to find a solution to the problem of ships colliding and killing whales in the ocean.

These ship strikes are particularly concerning for the West Coast, which is home to the blue whale – the largest animal that has ever lived and an endangered species. Researchers say there were multiple documented incidents of fatal strikes in the Santa Barbara Channel in the late 2000s, with at least five whales killed in 2007.

You hear a mix of nature, and man in some wetlands near UC Santa Barbara.

There’s the chirping of birds, the wind blowing through brush, and the sound of earth movers off in the dance.

Usually, the sound of earthmovers around wetlands is a bad thing for the environment, because it means development is taking away a slice of nature. But, bulldozers are going to be moving here on UCSB’s North Campus to help nature, by returning a half century old golf course to wetlands.

Birgit Luef, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Some of the planet’s smallest microbes are so small they were unknown until just a few years ago.

Now, a UC Santa Barbara researcher working with other scientists has shown these common yet mysterious organisms have an amazing ability to self-mutate as part of their survival.

Photo by Darcy Bradley

A UC Santa Barbara researcher has been studying how scuba diving with sharks – which has become a multi-million-dollar global tourism industry -- impacts the shark population. The findings were surprising.

With a quarter of shark species at risk of extinction, Darcy Bradley, a postdoctoral researcher with the Sustainable Fisheries Group at UCSB, wanted to know if scuba diving influences the behavior and the abundance of shark populations.

“So, our question very simply was:  Do sharks avoid areas that are frequented by scuba divers?” she said.

There’s shock in the U-C Santa Barbara community, following the death of a former student in an accident.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office detectives say Kenneth Yun was trying to sit on the second story railing of an apartment on the 800 block of Embarcadero Del Norte in Isla Vista when he lost his balance. He landed in an asphalt parking lot, severely injuring his head. He was taken to a Santa Barbara hospital, where he underwent emergency surgery, but he died several hours after their early morning Sunday accident.

A Nobel Prize winner who lives on the South Coast has a lot more honors to add to his resume.

UC Santa Barbara Theoretical Physicist David Gross shared the prize in physics in 2004 for his work in quantum chromodynamics.

Now, the Chinese Academy of Science has awarded Gross an honorary doctorate degree, and the Russian Academy of Sciences has saluted the UCSB researcher with its Medal of Honor.

A million dollar grant from an anonymous donor is going to help researchers at a South Coast university try to tackle one of the biggest mysteries in the field of physics.

The issue is trying to develop a quantum theory of gravity. The new UC Santa Barbara effort is intended to try to solve the conflict between Einstein’s theory of general relativity and quantum theory.

An anonymous Japanese donor gave a million dollars to UCSB’s Department of Physics to create a new postdoctoral program called Fundamental Physics Fellows.

ScienceLine

Kids in the Tri-Counties who are curious about anything science-related can get their answers from real-life scientists.

It’s called ScienceLine. It’s a website in which students and teachers from local elementary, middle and high schools submit science questions, and UC Santa Barbara scientists answer them.

“It’s a good way to encourage kids not only to learn science but to develop curiosity and think about how to do science,” UCSB Emeritus bio-physics professor Helen Hansma said. 

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