mountain lions

(NPS Photo)

There’s been yet another mountain lion death in our region.

The remains of a mountain lion known to researchers as P-41 were found in the Verdugo Mountains northwest of Burbank. Biologists think his death may be related to the recent La Tuna brush fire in the area, because when mountain lions burn their paws on hot ground, they are unable to hunt.

A necropsy has been scheduled on the carcass of the 10 year old big cat. Biologists have been tracking a number of mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area in Ventura and Los Angeles Counties.

(Caltrans photo)

An environmental report has been released on a cutting edge proposal to build the state’s first wildlife highway crossing on Highway 101.

Caltrans is proposing construction of the crossing west of Liberty Canyon Road, in Agoura Hills.

(NPS Photo)

They’re cute and they appear to be cuddly, but you probably wouldn’t want to play with the South Coast’s newest residents because they have sharp teeth, and big claws.

Researchers say they’ve discovered two new mountain lion cubs in the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, and its possible their father may be related to them in four different ways, due to inbreeding.

It’s a group dedicated to supporting a huge slice of nature in our region.

The odds are good you’ve never heard of it, but the Santa Monica Mountains Fund  is a key supporter of the 150,000 acre plus Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

(National Park Service photo)

Biologists say the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation area has a cute new resident, in the form of a mountain lion cub.

National Park Service and State Department of Fish and Wildlife researchers say they’ve discovered a four week old kitten. The parents are believed to be two mountain lions biologists have been tracking, the female known as P-23 and the male P-30.

(National Park Service photo)

Researchers say there’s new evidence that rat poison is posing a big threat to bobcats, and mountain lions in eastern Ventura County.

A necropsy on a sick bobcat in the Simi Hills which had to be euthanized showed that poison was a major factor in the big cat’s illness. Rat poison gets into the food chain through small rodents which are then eaten by bobcats and mountain lions. The poison has been found in 90% of the bobcats in and around the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area being studied by researchers.

(National Park Service photo)

There’s been yet another mountain lion struck and killed by a vehicle in our region, and this time it was a cub.

Details have just been released about the December 20th accident on Highway 118 in Simi Valley, near the Kuehner Drive exit. The seven month old male kitten was the son of P-52, an adult female which was also struck and killed by a vehicle on a nearby stretch of the 118 in early December. The cub’s death is the 14th known case of a mountain lion being struck and killed by a vehicle in or near the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation area.

(National Park Service photo)

Another mountain lion that’s part of a study of the big cats living in, and around the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation area has died, leaving behind a number of kittens.

The three year old adult female known as P-39 was apparently struck and killed December 3rd on Highway 118, just outside of Simi Valley near Rocky Peak Road.

(NPS Photo)

They are cute little kitties now, but you probably wouldn’t want to meet them on a hike when they’re adults. Two litters of mountain lion kittens have been discovered in the eastern Ventura County mountains.

National Park Service researchers who’ve been tracking mountain lions in the region discovered the two separate litters in the Santa Susana Mountains. The mountains are an important habitat linkage between the Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation area, and the Los Padres National Forest. The three female, and two male kittens were discovered last month.

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