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Three additional coronavirus related deaths have been reported on the Central and South Coasts, bringing the region’s total to 117.

Ventura County had two additional deaths, and San Luis Obispo County one more.  Ventura County has now had 73 deaths, Santa Barbara County 32, and San Luis Obispo County 12.  Most of those who died were older adults with preexisitng health issues.

(NASA photo)

We are surrounded by different types of life, but researchers say we are still scratching the surface of what exists.  Imagine what it would be like to discover some new forms of life. 

The buzz of hair clippers is missing from a well know Conejo Valley barber shop.  The barber’s chairs at Joshua’s Men’s Parlor and Couture are empty.  Owner Joshua Juarez and barber Sergio Salvador are doing some paperwork.

The coronavirus crisis has forced the Thousand Oaks barber shop to shut down for a second time, adding to an already tough time for the more than two decade old business.

It’s been a rough two weeks for the battle against coronavirus on the Central and South Coasts, with the number of new cases continuing to surge in the region. 

The county’s most recent update included 75 new cases, with the total standing at 3943 Monday morning.

In recent days, there have been concerns about messaging and testing on the South Coast when it comes to COVID-19.

But Santa Barbara County's Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso says one thing is certain: "You must assume that everybody you come into contact [with] is infectious, and thereby need to take the precaution."

The college world has been rocked by a move by the federal government which threatens the ability of international students to continue their educations in the United States.  It potentially affects thousands of students on the Central and South Coasts, and is an unexpected offshot of the coronavirus crisis.

If a foreign student is enrolled at a college which only offers online instruction in the fall, they either have to switch schools or go home.

More than 126,000 people in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties have now been tested for coronavirus.  While the number sounds impressive, it's still less than 10% of the region 1.3 million residents.

What is the experience like?  KCLU's Lance Orozco takes us along as he gets tested for the first time.

The coronavirus crisis has been challenging.  It’s forced many people to come up with creative solutions to many things we usually take for granted.  In Ventura County, one school’s effort to come up with a way to teach art remotely not only led to some unique works, but to a one of a kind museum exhibition.

There’s a steady stream of customers at small Mexican restaurant tucked away in the corner of a Thousand Oaks shopping center.  Business is good, but not great for the restaurant, called “Three Amigos.”  Like many small businesses on the Central and South Coasts, it’s trying to figure out how to survive in the coronavirus world.

Coronavirus is surging statewide, including here at home, on the Central and South Coasts.

200 new cases were reported in the region Wednesday, including 99 in Ventura County.  Ventura County’s Public Health Officer says we are at a critical point in efforts to contain it.  Dr. Robert Levin says with the reopening of much of the economy, many people are acting like the crisis is over, when it’s not.

California Governor Gavin Newsom has a tough message about efforts to contain coronavirus in California

He says while some people are asking whether the recent surge in coronavirus cases means we're in a second wave, the reality is we're not done with the first wave yet.

Santa Barbara County health officials are concerned about a spike in new coronavirus cases, and an increase in the number of hospitalizations.  They say while there is still solid empty hospital capacity, they are also worried about the potential for intensive care units  to fill up rapidly.

For the last three months, we’ve had to make changes in out lives to cope with being in the middle of a pandemic.  We’re in the middle of a major event in history.  How will it be remembered?  Some South Coast college history students have set aside their books to document the coronavirus crisis through their personal experiences, in a project dubbed “The Plague Journals.”

A South Coast researcher has received a $5 million dollar federal grant to help us learn more about women’s brain health. 

The coronavirus crisis has been hard on everyone, but some of the hardest hit people have been those in long term care and nursing facilities. 

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