Jessica Taylor

Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders won the Wisconsin primaries Tuesday night, an important step for both candidates as they look to stop their leading rivals and close their delegate gaps.

For the Republican Texas senator, he's on pace for a nearly double-digit win over Donald Trump, increasing the likelihood of a contested Republican convention this July in Cleveland.

There's a lot on the line for both parties in Tuesday's Wisconsin contest. For Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, the state is a prime chance to stop Donald Trump and complicate the GOP front-runner's path to the nomination. For Bernie Sanders, a win over Hillary Clinton helps close his delegate deficit and gives the Vermont senator new momentum heading into the next stretch of the primary calendar.

Ted Cruz and Donald Trump don't agree on much lately, but the two GOP presidential candidates are in accord on one thing — it's time for Ohio Gov. John Kasich to get out of the race.

Scott Walker never got the chance to officially face off with Donald Trump at the ballot box — but if the GOP front-runner loses on the Wisconsin governor's home turf, it still could be a victory of sorts for the former presidential candidate.

The war of words between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz reached a new fever pitch on Thursday, with Cruz calling his GOP rival a "sniveling coward" after the real estate mogul retweeted an insult aimed at the Texas senator's wife.

Bernie Sanders and Ted Cruz each notched victories in Tuesday's Western contests, but Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's big wins in Arizona still mean their overall delegate lead won't change much.

On the Democratic side, Sanders won big victories in the Utah and Idaho caucuses, but the much smaller prizes could end up netting him roughly the same number of delegates Clinton will get from her Arizona win.

White House hopefuls are heading West on Tuesday as both parties face voters in Arizona and Utah, while Democrats will caucus in Idaho.

For Republicans, it's another chance to try to stop Donald Trump's mounting delegate advantage, and the states voting Tuesday aren't necessarily the friendly terrain he has been used to.

Donald Trump took a detour from the campaign trail on Monday to try to build relationships with Republican officials and reach out to Jewish voters — while also promoting his latest signature building just blocks from the White House.

The GOP presidential front-runner met Monday morning with several GOP lawmakers who are backing his campaign, which has met resistance from much of the rest of the Republican establishment.

But if his trip was intended to try to grow his support within Washington circles, it's not clear he made much progress.

Mitt Romney will cast his vote for Ted Cruz in Tuesday's Utah GOP caucuses, he announced on Facebook Friday afternoon.

But that doesn't necessarily mean the 2012 Republican presidential nominee is rooting for the Texas senator to win the nomination or that he's endorsing his bid. Instead, the choice is a continuation of Romney's broader strategy to deny Donald Trump the GOP nomination and force an open convention this summer in Cleveland.

Hillary Clinton was declared the winner of the Missouri Democratic primary by The Associated Press on Thursday evening, nearly two days after the state held its primary.

She eked out a slim victory of just 1,531 votes over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders. That's a difference of just three-tenths of a percent and was within the margin of a possible recount, but Sanders said earlier Thursday he wouldn't ask for that.

Federal appeals court judge Merrick Garland headed to Capitol Hill Thursday afternoon to meet with senators, beginning the traditional ritual of any nominee to the Supreme Court.

But for the former prosecutor, the exercise could be in vain. Senate Republicans are holding steadfast in their refusal to even consider Garland's nomination to succeed the late Justice Antonin Scalia, who died unexpectedly last month.

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio announced Tuesday night that he was suspending his campaign for president after losing his home state in a landslide to Donald Trump.

"After tonight it is clear that while we are on the right side, we will not be on the winning side," Rubio told supporters in Miami.

Rubio congratulated Donald Trump at the start of his speech, but later appeared to criticize the real estate mogul's tactics.

The GOP presidential field dropped by one candidate on Tuesday night, but Republicans are still no closer to uniting behind a nominee.

Democrats, however, did get more clarity as Hillary Clinton racked up more wins over Bernie Sanders, extending her delegate lead and complicating the Vermont senator's nomination calculation.

Even though Tuesday may not have more delegates or states in play than Super Tuesday, March 1, had, it's still a big day, with more than 1,000 delegates at stake. More importantly, the results could end up deciding who the Republican and Democratic presidential candidates will be.

Five states are casting votes on March 15, along with one U.S. territory on the GOP side.

Update: The Cumberland County Sheriff's Office officially decided not to file charges against Donald Trump, North Carolina TV station WRAL reports:

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