Amy Held

Amy Held is an editor on the newscast unit. She regularly reports breaking news on air and online.

A quick glance at the place where West Alexis and Secor roads meet in Toledo, Ohio, reveals just another intersection of concrete and capitalism: A Western Union, a gym and a chicken joint frame the flow of traffic. But out of a crack in the curb, a scrawny weed pushes forth that has come to embody a city's holiday cheer.

University of Toledo student Alyssa Emrick, 20, tells NPR that she and her family had often driven past the weed recently on their way to and from church. Then on Dec. 9, a light went off for her father, Troy.

More than 2,500 tons of raw beef are being added to a recall in connection with a salmonella outbreak that federal officials say has sickened hundreds of people across 25 states.

Dog owners are advised to check labels and remain alert to symptoms of vitamin D toxicity, after the FDA issued a warning that it found excessive — and possibly toxic — levels of the nutrient in certain dry dog foods and some pets have exhibited signs of the poisoning.

The dog foods all come from a single as-yet-unnamed manufacturer and are marketed under at least eight brand names including Abound, Orlando and Natural Life, sold at Kroger, Lidl and other retailers, the FDA said.

Lying in the middle of an inlet about two miles from shore, Denmark's island of Lindholm could be described as inhospitable; for decades cattle and swine suspected of harboring exotic viral diseases were shipped there to be studied. Now, the Danish government says the island will host another set of unwanted inhabitants: rejected asylum seekers who can't go home and foreigners convicted of crimes.

A 31-year-old British man accused of spying for the U.K. government while on an apparent academic research trip in the United Arab Emirates was handed a life sentence Wednesday.

Matthew Hedges, a doctoral candidate at England's Durham University, was detained at Dubai International Airport on May 5 after a two-week research trip for his thesis on Emirati security and foreign policy, his wife, Daniela Tejada, told Human Rights Watch.

This Thanksgiving, bitter — possibly record — cold could be served up alongside slices of turkey in the eastern U.S., while snow the day before could complicate travel on one of the busiest travel days of the year. Farther west, rain in the forecast could be disastrous for a region already devastated by wildfires.

A cold front moving through the Northeast on Wednesday was spreading some light snow in New England and the northern Mid-Atlantic, said David Roth, forecaster with the National Weather Service's Weather Prediction Center.

It was a typical London scene at No. 10 Downing St. on Tuesday: wet and gray, a television reporter wading into the seemingly bottomless bog that is Brexit, when in a flash there was the feline fix ushering in some much-needed levity.

Larry the cat, who lives at and lords over the prime minister's residence, sat on the stoop, waiting for a human to do his bidding and let him in out of the damp.

The suspect in Saturday's Tree of Life Synagogue shooting walked into a federal courtroom in Pittsburgh on Thursday and pleaded not guilty to all 44 counts against him. The case is set for a jury trial and could result in the death penalty.

A day earlier, a federal grand jury charged Robert Bowers of Baldwin, Pa., with the murder of 11 people, as well as with hate crimes.

New York City police are still puzzling over what happened a week ago when two bodies facing each other in death and bound together by duct tape were found in the waters of the Hudson River.

Police have identified the bodies as sisters Rotana Farea, 22, and Tala Farea, 16, who had emigrated with their family from Saudi Arabia to Fairfax, Va., a few years ago.

More than 50 people reportedly were killed Friday when a train plowed through revelers who had gathered on the outskirts of the northern Indian city of Amritsar for the Hindu celebration of Dussehra marking the triumph of good over evil.

Witnesses told media outlets that as crowds spilled onto the train tracks, the booming of fireworks and the general celebratory din may have masked the sound of the oncoming train.

Jokes aside about flying squirrels, nuts served on planes and bushy-tailed passengers, squirrels and planes do not actually mix. At least not on Tuesday at Orlando International Airport, where an unidentified passenger hadn't gotten the memo.

Waiting in a coffee shop, swimming, barbecuing — just a few recent examples of unremarkable activities that turned into headlines after the black people engaging in them had the police called on them.

Police in Germany arrested a suspect in connection with the rape and killing of Bulgarian journalist Viktoria Marinova, whose brutal slaying on Saturday elicited international condemnation and accusations that the 30-year-old had been targeted for her investigative journalism.

A Romanian man was briefly detained on Tuesday in connection with Saturday's high-profile rape and killing of Bulgarian journalist Viktoria Marinova, but after questioning, a Bulgarian official said the unidentified man would be released without charge.

Marinova's beaten and strangled body was found in the bushes by the banks of the Danube River in the northern Bulgarian city of Ruse, police said.

Life lately in the tiny northern Minnesota town of Gilbert has resembled a scene out of an Alfred Hitchcock film. Birds, lots of birds, have been "flying into windows, cars and acting confused," according to the city police department, which has been fielding reports from anxious residents.

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