Arts & Culture

Arts & culture

A 10-minute drive from the White House — where immigration has a top spot on the President's "to-do" list — a museum has filled three of its floors with artists' reactions to displacement, relocation and flight.

When you stand in the center of Plaza del Congreso in downtown Buenos Aires, looking at the dome of Argentina's Capitol building, there's an imposing grey ghost of a building just to the right. It's a deteriorating art nouveau masterpiece: the Edificio del Molino, closed for decades, and now in the middle of a multi-year restoration.

The restorers opened it to the public for just a few hours recently, and a crowd started lining up on the sidewalk hours early, two and three abreast. When the doors finally opened, the line stretched almost three blocks.

Looking back on the past year of sessions this week, World Cafe is digging into the archives for some performances and interviews since last January. You'll hear sessions with artists including young producer, singer, multi-instrumentalist King Princess, the young rockers of Cage The Elephant, folk musician Rhiannon Giddens and more.

Listen to all the sessions below.

Talk about chutzpah. Two female mystery writers have just helped themselves to the titles of two novels written by canonical male authors, without even a please or a thank you.

Diver and photographer Jill Heinerth has explored unmapped, underwater caves deep in the earth, as well as the submerged crevices of an iceberg. She has seen hidden creatures and life forms that have never been exposed to the light of day.

"Since I was the smallest child, I always wanted to be an explorer — to have an opportunity to go someplace where nobody has ever been before," she says. "As an artist with my camera, it's an incredible opportunity to document these places and bring back images to share with others."

President Donald Trump has called himself “the least racist person” in the world, while a 2018 poll found a majority of Americans consider him to be a racist.

These three romance novels are perfect for the homestretch of summer, when it's too hot to go outside and all you want to do is lie under the air conditioner with a book. Whether in the Wild West or big city, online or IRL, these three stories show that romance and happy ever afters are everywhere — if you dare to reach for them.

What is lurking beneath Herbert Powyss' house?

That's the question at the center of British author Alix Nathan's novel, The Warlow Experiment. Powyss is a country gentleman. He prefers gardens and books to people; spends his days designing hothouses for his estate, growing exotic seeds, grafting pear trees and submitting minor horticultural findings to the world's preeminent scientific body, the Royal Society.

During a visit to London last month, I was pretty excited to try the slow-cooked curries at Masala Zone. Almost as soon as I sat down, however, the manager told me he didn't want my business.

Memories Of Home: Share Yours As A Poem

Aug 19, 2019

Writers draw on memories to create some of their best work.

Morning Edition wants to hear your memories of home and where you come from — through poetry.

Draw on all five senses. Share with us the people or places or smells that define your home. Be original!

Here's an example from NPR's resident poet Kwame Alexander.

"I am from words and art and books
"I am from discipline and hard work; the sound of coins in a jar"

The music of Taylor McFerrin can sound like something out of science fiction, yet with a soulful quality. The hip-hop beats he grew up with in the '90s form the backbone of his sound, but what gives it that otherworldly feel are synthesizers used by jazz musicians from the 1970s.

"Something about those sounds spoke to me so much," Taylor says. "And if I think about all the hip hop that I was getting into, it was always people that were sampling that era of music.

There are comedy creators whose sensibilities are darker than Danny McBride's. There are some whose satire is sharper, some whose characterizations are weaker, some whose sense of the moment is more or less developed. But there is no one more convinced than Danny McBride of the raw, unstoppable comedic power of male nudity — both frontal and rear.

Ally Schmaling wants a "complete annihilation of gender."

The Boston-based queer and gender nonbinary photographer created a portrait series exploring queer and nonbinary identities — people living without limits and refusing to identify with traditional male and female gender labels.

"It's our job to push institutions forward and create art that reflects the world we want to see," Schmaling says.

"Sometimes, I feel I got to get away," sang the Who in their 1965 single "The Kids Are Alright," and no wonder the song became an instant classic for the youth of Townshend and Daltrey's g-g-g-generation — teenagers of every age tend toward the restive, longing to experience life beyond whichever town or city they were raised in.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Saida Dahir from Salt Lake City is a student activist who uses spoken word to explore her place in America and the world. On the eve of her high school graduation, she recorded this poem.

(SOUNDBITE OF POEM, "THE WALKING STEREOTYPE")

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