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Diabetes deaths soared to 100,000 last year. One expert says societal issues are the cause

A woman with diabetes monitors her glycemia in Paris on March 24, 2020. (Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images)
A woman with diabetes monitors her glycemia in Paris on March 24, 2020. (Franck Fife/AFP via Getty Images)

With medical headlines focused on the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s easy to miss other dramatic numbers. One that bears reporting is that 100,000 people with diabetes died in 2021, the second consecutive year with a dramatic rise.

While the pandemic exacerbated the increases in diabetic complications and spotlighted the disease’s prevalence in disadvantaged communities, there are other factors at play as well.

Dr. William Herman is a diabetes researcher and professor of medicine at the University of Michigan. He’s also chairman of the National Clinical Care Commission that recently released a report calling for a whole new approach to preventing diabetes deaths. He joins host Scott Tong to discuss his findings.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.