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Where You'll Be Able To See The Annular Solar Eclipse Thursday Morning

An annular eclipse of the sun, photographed on the rooftop of a hotel in Xiamen City, China, on June 21, 2020. (Costfoto/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
An annular eclipse of the sun, photographed on the rooftop of a hotel in Xiamen City, China, on June 21, 2020. (Costfoto/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

There’s a solar eclipse happening early in the morning on June 10. It’s not a total eclipse like we saw in 2017, but an annular eclipse, in which there’s still a ring of sunlight visible around the moon.

Very few people will be able to catch that, but people in the eastern U.S. should be able to see a partial eclipse at dawn.

Sky & Telescope senior editor Kelly Beatty explains how to see it and what it’ll look like.

Remember: Don’t look directly at the sun!

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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